Nº. 1 of  575

Potentiality knocks on the door of my heart.

ABOUT; ASK; Closet Curator; LAST.FM;

deadbyshawn:

deadbyshawn:

appreciate brown eyes more bc the people with brown eyes are grown up forcing to believe fuckin blue and green and grey are beautiful and either detest or get incredibly happy when someone compliments their eye color stop letting this happen

there are people with brown eyes reblogging this and theyre talking about still being sad with their eye color and this is exactly why we need hype about brown eyes

beautiful people with brown eyes:

-audrey hepburn

-naomi campbell

-eva mendes

-all of girls’ generation like wow

-emma watson

- natalie portman

-jourdan dunn

brown eyes are warm and beautiful. i have brown eyes myself and i love the color..

embrace your eye color <3

(via newportonmymind)

isaia:

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Marc Johns needs to sit down

isaia:

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Marc Johns needs to sit down

(via congalineofdurin)

wekilledcouture:

v4to:

pxrelily:

Abbey

still not over it

My queen

(Source: messgala)

(Source: johnlindley665, via langleav)

clueless-gamer:

2snowy4u:

imivi:

jointeamfreewill:

gipsy-bones:

unicornpancakes:

ask-the-multishipper:

image

oh god what did i do

image

IT SUMMONS MAIL EVERYONE TRY IT

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HOLY FUCKING COW.

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OKAY IT’S TRUE

imageWHAT

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image

???

image

image

I THOUGHT IT WAS A JOKE

WHAT HOW

I’ve been wondering what message it sends for awhile now, apparently it’s random?

(via twerk101)

myersandbriggs:

SEES SELF: as a deep-thinker in love with new ideas and insights, but somewhat detached from others.

OVERRIDING NEED: to understand the complexity of people and life.

IRRITATED BY: hypocrisy, limits on personal freedom, impersonal details and mundane tasks.

STRENGTHS: provides future-oriented insights that inspire others, follows through on commitments with integrity and consistency.

(Source: cohabmonkey.com)

cnnbreaking:

white people: this mint gum is spicy

(Source: 911official, via likeneelyohara)

When I was 14 -years-old, I made this PowerPoint presentation, and I invited my parents into my room and gave them popcorn. It was called ‘Project Hollywood 2004’ and it worked. I moved to L.A. in January of 2004

(Source: emmajeansstone, via zeldaux)

Nº. 1 of  575